12/21/09

Goddess of the Week: Holda

Getting ready for Santa Claus? Thank Holda. This Teutonic goddess, depicted as a gorgeous blond in a flowing red and white gown, governed many realms. It all depended upon who you asked and where you asked them. She was known variously as goddess of the

Captioned as Image via Wikipedia

weather, goddess of winter, goddess of wealth and prosperity, and the goddess of generosity.

She flew through the night on December 24th, which was known as Mother Night, bringing gifts and happiness to all she encountered. She was especially fond of children and was known to drop down chimneys and bring them presents.

To thank Holda for her generosity, people often left milk and food out for her on her special night of gift giving.

Now doesn't this sound familiar?

Channel this goddess when: Aren't you channeling her already? Or are you one of those smarty pants who's already finished her Christmas shopping. Ho, ho, ho.


Need a goddess? Of course you do! Leave me a comment telling me what you need her for and I'll see what I can do.

21 comments:

Desiree said...

Wow! Patriarchy crushes goddesses and soon they are invisible.
Great post! Never knew!

Big Fat Mama said...

Fascinating. I need to know more. Will check out those links.

Deb said...

Hm. Who knew? It figures that a woman was at the crux of this - more surprising that a man took it over and kept the duties all these years! ha!

Joanne said...

Count me among the smarty-pants ;)

Petrea said...

I'm putting Holda on my list of favorites. I love searching our deep, dark memory-past for the origins of our current memes. Love her!

Susan C said...

Maybe this is why Santa says Ho,Ho,Ho(lda).

Vanda said...

It figures patriarchy would turn a good looking woman into a fat old geezer. Pfft.

Bec said...

Hadn't heard this one before - thanks for sharing the story. I had a great-grandmother named Huldah . . .

altadenahiker said...

Darn, I like her a lot better than SC.

Thank you for this.

... daisy... said...

Mother Christmas at last!!!! So good to know!
I wish I could write her a letter and ask her for more sincerity in my life... ;-)

Shell Sherree said...

Well, how about that! I love Holda ~ I think I'll leave some macarons out with the milk especially for her.

devonellington said...

I've actually finished my shopping, but I'm very fond of Holda, in general! Of course I'll be honoring her throughout the winter!

The Solstice Trifle (pictured on my blog today) is dedicated to her.

Lovely story!

pasadenaadjacent.com said...

I've been "Holda" back and hitting the party scene. Now I'm paying the price. Today I head to costco. Everyone is getting super sized jars of sun dried tomatoes.

pasadenaadjacent.com said...

Holda as an older form of Frigg whose name must be the source of the word frigid. A term I recall young boys were quick to taunt us with if we didn't give into their sexual advances. It's interesting to note that Holda takes on the form of a old crone.

naughty or nice....hmmm

Daisy said...

I KNEW it! Santa IS a woman!
Hooorayyy!

Faith Berry said...

Awesome, Santa is a woman!

Cafe Observer said...

Do you have a color photograph of this goddess, MF?

Italo said...

So you want to say me that Santa claus is a woman? After Dan brown wrote the graal is not a cup but blood, now all world changes.
Now seriously, great post: I'd like to have Holda these days, some friends need help and Holda could help them. :) ciao.

... daisy... said...

While you're on holiday and I am waiting for your next post, I found the goddess I love the most: Bast! Yes Goddess of Moon and Sun... it combines the two women characteristic: tenderness and aggressiveness... while watching Catwoman (I know...) my mum heard this and she said that could be me! :DDD Anyway... I like this Goddess... maybe you can write about her one day... if you haven't already and I missed it! :-) Happy Holidays!!!

Poconoangel said...

Happy New Year!! To Holda too! LOL!

Alison said...

wow. I learn a lot when I read your blog. I'm currently reading a book that touches upon how pagan holidays were altered by the Catholic Church.