8/24/10

Goddess of the Week: Oonagh

Three Celtic goddesses, as depicted at Coventi...Image via WikipediaStar needs a goddess of perseverance, or, as she says, a "put your head down to the wind-keep on keepin' on-you can do it-this, too, shall pass-there's light at the end of the tunnel" goddess." I Thought long and hard about this one because -- sister -- I need her too. And I know who we need: we need Oonagh.

Oonagh is an ancient, ancient Irish goddess. She and her tribe were the Tuathas de Danaans -- children of the mother goddess Dana. They arrived in Ireland on dark clouds and lived there all magically immortal for a good long time until the Celts came with the one weapon that could vanquish their magic: the iron sword.

Ain't that just the way things always go? You're hanging out, doing your thing, feeling all good and secure, and -- suddenly, out of nowhere -- come those upstart interlopers with their damn iron swords chopping the legs right out from under you. Ok. Maybe your particular iron sword looks more like a lost job, a sick kid, a new boss, or some trollop in a D cup. But you know what I mean: something comes along and your magic -- your mojo -- is sucked away. You're left panting for breath, fighting against the wind, wondering how long you will have to endure this nightmare.

Oonagh had a better idea. Instead of waiting for the end to come, she and her people wrote themselves a new narrative. Instead of becoming the gods defeated by the iron sword, they became the gods who re-invented real estate. That's right! They moved underground and made little magical tree and bush entrances into their new homes so that they could come and go into our world as they pleased. These days, they are known as Leprechauns.

It is really hard to be in that place where everything stinks and you're just trying to get by everyday. Believe me, I know. But Oonagh teaches us that sometimes the way to survive is to re-write the story, or at least re-define the story, or a least re-define how you participate in the story. Only then, will you defeat the iron sword.

Channel this goddess: When you feel your endurance wearing thin, when your troubles seems unbeatable, when your moxie is on empty.

Need a goddess: I got goddesses! Post a comment telling me what you're looking for. I'll take care of the rest.
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20 comments:

uwant2gogo said...

Love this, Margaret! I have been thinking a lot lately about rewriting the story instead of becoming a victim of the narrative. And creating magical trees and bushes in their dens...isn't that what us writers do all the time?

altadenahiker said...

My thought was always a walk-in closet encased in steel and only I had the combination. and there would be great fluffy pillows on the floor and cabinets full of all the food I like to eat.

Unless you have a toothache, are starving, or dying, I do believe it's all a matter of perspective. But so what? That's usually out of our control as well.

... daisy... said...

My car broke down a month ago and it's still at the mechanic's... I injured my knee more or less back then too and it still hurts... my parent's car broke down and they decided to live without it...
and still... I can't stop smiling! The train seems a good friend now and people help me with the bags when I can't go straight! Well... I need this Goddess too, but I just love to think that life could be worse so... make the best out of what you have, no?
I love your posts! They're like chocolate: containing the hormone of happiness!

Jean Spitzer said...

Re-write and re-define--I like this!

Stacey @ Entropified said...

Reinvention . . . Reinvention . . . pondering this . . .

Susan C said...

I like what you wrote, Margaret, and I also like uwant2gogo's comment about a "victim of the narrative." I may not be able to rewrite, but I can certainly view and tell the story (as AH says) from a different perspective. Thank you!

Petrea said...

I believe that learning to change your perspective is an essential skill. Some people can see only the negative side of every situation. Being able to look for positives is a powerful tool. This is a good one, Margaret.

TheChieftess said...

Right On!!!

Shell Sherree said...

I can do with Oonagh at the moment ~ trying to look at a spanner in the works with fresh eyes. Perhaps I can visit the Leprechauns for inspiration.

Pasadena Adjacent said...

I'm delighted to now know the origins of Leprechauns. And a little disappointed to see that the girls have morphed into the Lucky Charms guy. See, it's my attitude. Always a cynic

Star said...

Thank you so much for this; you hit the nail on the head. I'm going to print it out, and read it, and re-read it, and re-read it, again and again, until I can figure out a way to find new magic in the situation, while lumbering one step at a time, one day at a time, toward the end of the tunnel.

Margaret said...

Star: So glad you approve. Best wishes on persevering.

PA: They were just goddesses, gods too. So I guess the Lucy Charms guy isn't completely wrong.

Don't y'all just love the word Oonagh?

Rois said...

Now I can so "Oh Oonagh" when things get rough instead of "Oh Da#n." it even feels better on the tongue and seems like it would also feel more hopeful.

Deb said...

"...or some trollop in a D cup..." LOL! I almost spit my coffee out onto the computer screen.

Love this take on this Goddess and the story behind the Lephrechan.

Daisy said...

I DO like the sound of "Oonagh". It can be easily prolonged on the tongue when the swords are thick and nasty.

Since you mentioned "trollops in D cups" how about a goddess for those of us who are getting all wrinkley and saggy of body - along with the aching joints, etc., etc. :-) Not that I ever was a "trollop"

Petrea said...

I second that, Daisy. Not the trollop thing, the aching joints goddess thing.

phoebat said...

oh boy Margaret... did i need this one.
for health reasons i need to rewrite my narrative. can't rely on the sheer will power that has gotten me this far... need to learn finesse and letting go.
this is a post i'm going to carry with me :) thank you

gaelikaa said...

Wow! A goddess from Ireland! Just like me, LOL. Anyway, Oonagh could be classified as the goddess of reinvention. Una is how we spell the name these days. I used to hear of the magical people living underground. Apparently, they used to steal human babies and leave their own ugly kids in their place. They were known as the 'sidhe' (pron. 'shee') and their women were called 'bean sidhe' (banshee) and used to cry when someone was about to die....yikes.....

Margaret said...

Phoebat: So glad this spoke to you. Thanks for your comment.

Gaelikaa: I always love when you can provide more info about these Celtic goddesses, so thanks for your input. Fascinating.

Petrea said...

Gaelikaa and Margaret, were the Tuatha de Danaan the forerunners of Faerie, or somehow tied in with those legends? I've always associated them with that.

In any case, I love this one, too, Margaret.